Tag: University of East Anglia

New executive director for The Sainsbury Laboratory

Picture By Jim Wileman  09/04/2014  Professor Nick Talbot, Professor of Molecular Genetics and Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Knowledge Transfer The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) has launched its new vision and announced the appointment of Prof Nicholas Talbot FRS as executive director.

Based at Norwich Research Park (NRP), TSL is a world-leading research institute working on the science of plant-microbe interactions.

Volunteers needed to protect Herts orchard heritage

© Public domainThe region’s orchards are an integral part of the landscape and an important source of biodiversity. They are also a rich, but under-researched, historical record.

Now the Landscape Group, part of the University of East Anglia’s (UEA’s) School of History, has been awarded £477,700 of National Lottery funding for a three-year project, Orchard’s East, to survey and record traditional orchards across the East of England.

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate change

© James Hutton InstituteMajor changes in agricultural practices will be required to offset increases in nutrient losses due to climate change, according to research published by a scientific consortium including the James Hutton Institute

Global issues to be tackled in ambitious research programme

© University of East Anglia

An academic from the University of East Anglia (UEA) is part of a consortium that has won a £6.5m grant to look at food security in India.

The funding, announced today by Minister of State for Universities and Science Jo Johnson, has been awarded by Research Councils UK as part of its Global Challenges Research Fund. The £225 million initiative aims to build upon research knowledge in the UK, and strengthen capacity overseas, to help address challenges, informed by expressed need in the developing countries.

Flower-rich habitats increase survival of bumblebee families

New research involving the University of East Anglia has revealed for the first time that flower-rich habitats are key to enhancing the survival of bumblebee families between years.

The results, which come from the largest ever study of its kind on wild bumblebee populations, will help farmers and policy makers manage the countryside more effectively to provide for these vital but declining pollinators.

How to be a successful pest: lessons from the green peach aphid

© Earlham InstituteUK scientists, in collaboration with groups in Europe and the US, have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programmes to support pest control and aid global food security.