Tag: UEA

Study predicts a significantly drier world at 2ºC

Over a quarter of the world’s land could become significantly drier if global warming reaches 2ºC, according to new research from an international team including the University of East Anglia (UEA).

The change would cause an increased threat of drought and wildfires.

But limiting global warming to under 1.5ºC would dramatically reduce the fraction of the Earth’s surface that undergoes such changes.

Royal accolade for ground-breaking environmental science

Half a century of ground-breaking environmental science at the University of East Anglia (UEA) has been recognised by the Queen today.

The School of Environmental Sciences will be awarded a Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

This is the UK’s most prestigious higher education award, given to those who can demonstrate outstanding work at a world-class level.

Volunteers needed to protect Herts orchard heritage

© Public domainThe region’s orchards are an integral part of the landscape and an important source of biodiversity. They are also a rich, but under-researched, historical record.

Now the Landscape Group, part of the University of East Anglia’s (UEA’s) School of History, has been awarded £477,700 of National Lottery funding for a three-year project, Orchard’s East, to survey and record traditional orchards across the East of England.

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate change

© James Hutton InstituteMajor changes in agricultural practices will be required to offset increases in nutrient losses due to climate change, according to research published by a scientific consortium including the James Hutton Institute

Flower-rich habitats increase survival of bumblebee families

New research involving the University of East Anglia has revealed for the first time that flower-rich habitats are key to enhancing the survival of bumblebee families between years.

The results, which come from the largest ever study of its kind on wild bumblebee populations, will help farmers and policy makers manage the countryside more effectively to provide for these vital but declining pollinators.

How to be a successful pest: lessons from the green peach aphid

© Earlham InstituteUK scientists, in collaboration with groups in Europe and the US, have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programmes to support pest control and aid global food security.