Tag: crop protection

Driving out blight with dual control

Combining methods of disease control rather than relying on a single resistance strategy can extend the durability of crops by many years, confirms computer modelling that draws on classical population genetics theory.

Tomatoes’ crystal ball reveals evolutionary secrets

© Michigan State University

Robert Last

Michigan State University‘s (MSU; USA) Robert Last studies tomatoes. Specifically, he researches their hair, or trichomes.

For this study, he focused on a single type of molecule in trichomes – acyl sugars. The secrets Last and a team of MSU scientists found from studying these specialized metabolites open an evolutionary window for the emerging field of plant defence metabolism, insights that could lead to engineering advances for better pest resistance and human medicine.

Crop protection research secured at Rothamsted

© Rothamsted ResearchRothamsted Research has secured government funding to kick-start its new five-year strategic programme, Smart Crop Protection (SCP), to control sustainably the pests, pathogens and weeds that destroy nearly a third of crops grown worldwide. The investment of circa £6.3 million covers the programme’s first three years.

Smart revolution promises sustainable crop protection in the age of digital agriculture

© Rothamsted ResearchFinding smarter and more sustainable ways to protect crops from pests, pathogens and weeds is at the heart of a new strategic alliance between Rothamsted Research and Bayer.

Building on a track record of collaborations, the alliance aims to support a digital revolution for detecting and managing these biotic threats more sustainably. 

Blueberry growers advised to remain alert about recently detected pest

© James Hutton InstituteThe blueberry aphid, Ericaphis scammelli, has been detected during routine aphid surveys by Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA) and is thought to be widespread across Scotland. It is also known to occur in other parts of the United Kingdom and Europe.

The pest can be found more on some cultivars than others with highest infestation levels between May and July.