NIAB issues warning over Brexit impact on UK agri-science

© NIAB TAG

NIAB Chairman Jim Godfrey

UK crop research organisation NIAB has warned that the EU Commission’s hardline negotiating stance on Brexit is already damaging prospects for UK agri-science, and has called on Ministers to safeguard the UK science base.

Speaking in Cambridge today (30 June), NIAB Chairman Jim Godfrey said the collateral damage of the Brexit talks was becoming a reality after NIAB had recently been notified that future EU variety testing contracts commissioned directly by the Community Plant Variety Office (CPVO) and which might last beyond the envisaged Brexit date of 30 March 2019 would no longer be awarded to the UK.

Discovery shows soil dwelling bacteria adapt to richer or poorer conditions in marriage of convenience with plants

Scientists at the John Innes Centre have identified a unique mechanism that the soil dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens uses to effectively exploit nutrients in the root environment.

The breakthrough offers multiple new applications, for the study of human pathogens, for synthetic biology, and for the productions of biosensors which help detect biological changes in plants and their environment.

Researchers urge agricultural industry to challenge barriers to women farmers

© James Hutton InstituteResearch by Newcastle University and the James Hutton Institute has found that women play a major role in Scottish agriculture, participating in the full range of farming activities. However, barriers remain to their entry into the industry, their career progression, and promotion to leadership roles.

These are some of the findings of research commissioned by the Scottish Government into the contribution of women to agriculture. The Women in Agriculture report was launched at the Royal Highland Show as part of the ‘Women in Agriculture Breakfast’, hosted by SRUC, with the participation of Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon.

Scotland’s first vertical indoor farm to be operational by Autumn 2017

Intelligent Growth Solutions (IGS), the Scottish-based vertical farming business, is set to complete the construction of its first indoor growth facility in the next few months. The purpose-built facility is being constructed at the James Hutton Institute‘s site in Invergowrie, near Dundee.

The completion of the indoor farm will allow for a full-scale trial to deliver the UK’s first commercially viable vertical growing environment through a collaboration with global automation business Omron

Father and Son flower growers

Copyright image 2017© Wednesday 14 June 2017 Ahead British Flowers Week next week, running from 19th to 25th June, Lincolnshire flower growing family Richard Robinson, centre, with sons Henry (turquoise shirt) and Charles (checked shirt) begin the harvest of early British sunflowers for Waitrose. Henry and Charles Robinson, are the sixth generation of flower growers, working on their 147 year old family farm, with their father Richard in the Fens, near Spalding. The farm has 420 acres of sunflower fields, with the growers picking eight to nine million stems a year. They also grow sweet Williams for the supermarket, which has a long standing commitment to supporting British growers. During the summer months, 60% of the flowers Waitrose sell are sourced from British farms. Waitrose Horticulture Buyer, Lucy Matthewson says, "Sunflowers are a true sign that summer is here and we're lucky to work with such dedicated British growers to offer our shoppers an abundance of homegrown flowers. And what could be more surprising than treating Dad this Father's Day to some colourful blooms, grown by a father and his sons." Photograph by Fiona Hanson/Waitrose For photographic enquiries please call Fiona Hanson 07710 142 633 or email info@fionahanson.com This image is copyright Fiona Hanson 2017©. This image has been supplied by Fiona Hanson and must be credited Fiona Hanson. The author is asserting his full Moral rights in relation to the publication of this image. All rights reserved. Rights for onward transmission of any image or file is not granted or implied. Changing or deleting Copyright information is illegal as specified in the Copyright, Design and Patents Act 1988. If you are in any way unsure of your right to publish this image please contact Fiona Hanson on07710 142 633 or email info@fionahanson.comAhead of British Flowers Week, early sunflowers are harvested for Waitrose, by a father and sons team in the Lincolnshire Fens, near Spalding. Henry and Charles Robinson are the sixth generation of flower growers, working on their 147 year old family farm, with their father Richard. The Robinson’s farm has 420 acres of sunflower fields, with the growers picking eight to nine million stems a year. They also grow sweet Williams for the supermarket, which has a long standing commitment to supporting British growers. During the summer months, 60% of the flowers Waitrose sell are sourced from British farms.

International scientific alliance launched for crop improvement in sub-Saharan Africa

© John Innes CentreAn international scientific alliance to fast track-crop improvement in sub-Saharan Africa is launched today.

The Alliance to Accelerate Crop Improvements in Africa (ACACIA) supports African scientists to find solutions to local food security challenges – and maximise the impact of the John Innes Centre’s cutting-edge science in Africa.