Cutting-edge research points the way to canker resistant parsnip varieties

Studies carried out by Warwick University‘s Dr Lauren Chappell, now an Elsoms plant pathologist, have identified the three main pathogens responsible for parsnip canker, providing a secure platform for the development of disease-resistant lines. Elsoms, a global leader in parsnip breeding, is investing heavily in research, state-of-the art breeding techniques and seed production to bring UK growers the very best varieties. 

Rothamsted questions EU pesticide ban as chemicals industry eyes Brexit for breakthrough on bees

Maintaining production of many UK crops is at risk if neonicotinoids, the pesticides linked with harming bees, are more widely restricted or banned completely, says Rothamsted Research in a position statement published today.

“Furthermore, if groups of chemistries are limited by legislation, the remaining groups will be more widely used, resulting in an increased risk of pests developing resistance to them,” continues the statement from Rothamsted, the longest-running agricultural research institute in the world.

Developing smart food for a new generation – safe and secure, competitive and sustainable

© Rothamsted Research

Professor Achim Dobermann

“Fresh thinking plus global science yields lasting benefit.” It’s the modern mantra of the world’s oldest research institute for agricultural science, which today launches an ambitious vision for the next five years at a time of unprecedented international uncertainty and diverse challenges, socially, economically and environmentally.

A sustainable food supply chain

© WaitroseScientists and Waitrose suppliers are coming together to share best practice to help create a sustainable global supply chain in fruit and veg.

They are meeting as part of the Waitrose Farm Assessment initiative, a series of training courses which started in 2011 to help suppliers improve their practice, and to quantify the impact of the changes they make.

Report outlines how climate change will affect gardeners

The ‘perfect’ English garden could become a thing of the past thanks to climate change, scientists at the University of Reading have warned as a new report is published.

The far-ranging Gardening in a Changing Climate report, written in part by scientists at the University of Reading, looks at both the current impact of climate change and the future of gardening in the UK.

The report, the first in-depth analysis of the effects of climate change on gardening for more than a decade, was led by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) and supported by Reading scientists, among others.