Author: LMartin

Crop protection research secured at Rothamsted

© Rothamsted ResearchRothamsted Research has secured government funding to kick-start its new five-year strategic programme, Smart Crop Protection (SCP), to control sustainably the pests, pathogens and weeds that destroy nearly a third of crops grown worldwide. The investment of circa £6.3 million covers the programme’s first three years.

Blueberry breeding consortium launched in Dundee

© James Hutton InstituteA Blueberry Breeding Consortium including members from three European countries held its inaugural meeting at the James Hutton Institute in Dundee yesterday.

The new consortium will fund a blueberry breeding programme which will deliver new and improved blueberry varieties, suited to European growing conditions and carrying traits desirable to growers, retailers and consumers. It has been set up and is managed by the Institute’s commercial subsidiary company, James Hutton Limited.

Dramatic changes needed in farming practices to keep pace with climate change

© James Hutton InstituteMajor changes in agricultural practices will be required to offset increases in nutrient losses due to climate change, according to research published by a scientific consortium including the James Hutton Institute

Smart revolution promises sustainable crop protection in the age of digital agriculture

© Rothamsted ResearchFinding smarter and more sustainable ways to protect crops from pests, pathogens and weeds is at the heart of a new strategic alliance between Rothamsted Research and Bayer.

Building on a track record of collaborations, the alliance aims to support a digital revolution for detecting and managing these biotic threats more sustainably. 

Harmony and collaboration for better food and farming

© Public domainA leading advocate of organic farming is urging proponents of sustainable agriculture to come together with research scientists to establish a joint strategy group that could present a united front to benefit food production and the environment.

New research tackles global food shortages with new government funding

© University of ReadingHelping North Africa become self-sufficient for protein needs, and reusing by-products of cocoa production in South East Asia are just some of the research projects that have received Government funding to tackle global challenges.

The work to address food sustainability, being investigated across departments including Food and Nutritional Sciences and Agriculture, Policy and Development at the University of Reading, has received almost £1m of grant funding from the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). The funding is provided by the UK Government and distributed by Research Councils.