Author: LMartin

New executive director for The Sainsbury Laboratory

Picture By Jim Wileman  09/04/2014  Professor Nick Talbot, Professor of Molecular Genetics and Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Knowledge Transfer The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) has launched its new vision and announced the appointment of Prof Nicholas Talbot FRS as executive director.

Based at Norwich Research Park (NRP), TSL is a world-leading research institute working on the science of plant-microbe interactions.

Boosting breeding of carbohydrate heavyweight cassava

CassavaUK crop researchers could boost yields of a vitally important global food crop by going back to its wild relatives to find new sources of disease resistance.

Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is an important staple for over 500 million people worldwide, grown for food and known in its dried form as tapioca, as animal feed and as a fuel source. The crop’s importance is set to grow with changing climates, but so too will threats from a number of pests and diseases which can devastate yield.

Continental controls needed to maintain fightback against tree diseases

Tighter controls on timber and plant movements into Europe are necessary to prevent further disastrous effects of plant diseases, a new study of the ash dieback pathogen advises.

The call to action follows detailed investigations carried out in British woodlands into the population makeup of the Hymenoscyphus fraxineus fungus that causes ash dieback.

Changing of the guard – research sheds light on how plants breathe

New research is set to change the textbook understanding of how plants breathe.

In research published in Plant Journal, a team led by Professor Richard Morris from the John Innes Centre, Norwich, Professor Silke Robatzek of The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, and collaborators from the University of Madrid, developed the first ever full 3D model of a guard cell.

Crowning the King of the Crops: Sequencing the White Guinea Yam Genome

An international collaboration involving the Earlham Institute, Norwich, UK, and the Iwate Biotechnology Research Centre, Japan, has for the first time provided a genome sequence for the white Guinea yam, a staple crop with huge economic and cultural significance on the African continent and a lifeline for millions of people.